Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to another edition of "Weekly Well-Being." It has been an exciting year (already) for me. It's also been a trying emotional month for my family. The combination of the two creates for a scatter-brained doctor and a newsletter that lacks a particular focus. Things come about unexpectedly that just have a way of throwing off your entire plan. Such is why it is so important to really just have a loose plan rather than one you expect to follow to a "T." With all that life throws at you, it's really difficult to stay on that strict path that you've planned. Life doesn't really work that way.

As always, I try to take things from my life and share them in a way that will in some way benefit you. So, since we're going down this road, I'll go forward with mentioning how difficult it can be to be planning on one thing and then BOOM something comes up that makes the old plan obsolete. Just 3 weeks ago, my life was heading in one direction. Now, it's heading in a new one. It's exciting, but it can be very frustrating, especially if the effects of the new direction are felt by more than just you. The hectic nature of change can put serious strains on relationships if you allow it to. Obviously, then, we can't allow for that. Our personal relationships are vitally important to maintaining healthy minds and hearts. What do we do, then?

Communication is the key. If everything is out in the open, then you decrease the chances of letting situations escalate past where they need to. There's a reason "they" say it's best to not let stress build up inside of you and eat away at you...it's just not healthy...neither for you or your relationships. You have everything to gain and nothing to lose by being open and honest.

In all honesty, I let the stress I've been under get the best of me recently. I was highly irritable. Such is what happens when you are subluxated. The body has its way of telling you that it is p*ssed off at you for allowing it to continually function less than 100%. When that happens to me, my fuse gets really short. I become less pleasant to be around and deal with than usual. Ask anyone who has ever lived with me how pleasant I can be when irritated about something. Such is the reason why I got my spine checked the other day, found out that there was neurologic interference throwing off my normal cycle of life, and causing me to act like a jack...you get the picture. I got my spine corrected and I'm back to being me...

You'll be amazed how much more easily you'll adapt and react when you are level-headed...www.uppercervicalcare.com...find the closest upper cervical doc to you and get your spine checked...

Changing gears...

There was an article on the local NBC affiliates website a few days ago about chiropractic and kids. The article said that 3% of children receive chiropractic care, making it the 2nd most popular alternative healthcare form for kids. What was #1? Supplements. Wow. I'm just astounded by that...in a bad way. For the last 100 years, chiropractors have been helping kids overcome asthma and ear infections and strengthening their immune systems and overall well-being to the point where they don't ever even need to see a medical doctor...and only 3% of all kids in this country see a chiropractor?

The article goes on to quickly point out that lack of medical research performed to support chiropractic care; the claim is backed by a medical doctor from Wake Forest University. DOCTOR'S NOTE: Why would a chiropractor do medical research? The two entities are so entirely different.

In the Bible, Jesus says to "lay your hands on the sick and they shall be healed." What happened to his mentality over the last 2000 years? I'm pretty sure Jesus didn't go to the drug store...

That's what we work with, folks. In an effort not to sound too dogmatic, correcting the subluxation allows life to flow freely through the body. It's that simple...and unbelievably powerful.

Here's the article (referenced above) if you'd like to read it...

http://www.ksdk.com/news/health/story.aspx?storyid=165184&catid=9&provider=email

Condition of the Week: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Numbness, tingling, and pain in the hand and thumb is often referred to as carpal tunnel syndrome. This condition also involves loss of grip strength and pain radiating down the neck, shoulder, and arm.

The conventional way of addressing this problem is to wear a brace on the hand and wrist. The idea behind that is to relieve pressure on the median nerve, which is how the brain communicates with the majority of the hand. If that doesn't work, the next conventional method is to have surgery to cutting tissue and ligaments in the wrist. The success rate is laughably poor.

Let's say you just bought a beautiful new plant to put in your back yard. To make it grow, you have your sprinkler set up to water it every morning. The plant begins to grow and looks great. You are happy that you made the purchase. One day, though, you move the sprinkler and hose to mow the lawn. As you are pulling out the hose to hook it up to the sprinkler, it gets kinked and you don't notice. So, the water is no longer getting from the source to the sprinkler in the adequate amount. The plants leaves begin falling off. What leaves are left look brown and the stems off the main stalk look slumped. The plant appears to be dying. When the plant gets to the point that you notice, the first thing you do is check the water supply. You can put miracle grow or whatever other chemical on it all that you want, but the diminished water supply is the problem.

Your hand, in order to grow and function, receives life from the brain. You are pretty happy about it, obviously, because you can do all the things that having a fully functioning hand entails. One day, though, the top bone in the spine slides out of position and kinks the origin of the median nerve (the brainstem) that supplies life to the hand...and you don't notice. So, the nerve impulses are no longer getting from the brain to the hand in the adequate amount. The hand begins to go numb. It starts to hurt and cramp and you lose your grip strength. Believe it or not, the hand is slowly dying. When the symptoms get to the point where you notice, the first thing you should do is check the nerve supply. You can splint it, do surgery on it, and take pills for it all that you want, but the diminished nerve supply is the problem.

The median nerve, just like every other nerve in the body, originates at the brainstem when you are developing in utero. When the top bone slides out of position, it stresses the brainstem and disrupts the normal function of the body. Life lives through the nerves. If the brain can't properly send messages to the hand...it gets weak...and that, ladies and gentlemen, is how we get carpal tunnel syndrome. Remove the kink in the brainstem and let the nerve impulses flow to the hand, restoring life to it...