I was recently asked by a colleague of mine: "What is the most common condition you see in the office?" I initially wanted to say "the brainstem subluxation," but that's obviously not what the person was asking. So, I thought for a second and mentioned that it was probably Multiple Sclerosis (M.S.). This came as a surprise to him, but after explaining to him the concept of how Upper Cervical Care can not only help with the symptoms of M.S. (which include, among other things, fatigue, pain, loss of coordination, and visual problems) but also address the underlying cause - something that traditional medical treatments fail to do.

This brief conversation got me thinking that it'd probably be a good idea to share some of the latest about this condition, as even though the majority of you receiving this neither have the condition nor know anyone that does, I think the research that's come about really lends added credibility to the overall goal of M.S. Sadly, many people still take the M.D.'s word on everything, when in fact he/she only offers an opinion on one view of things (and, thus, should not be taken as gospel). Nevertheless, it is when medical doctors take notice that the general public takes notice. And, recently, the M.D.'s around the world are taking notice of the delicacy of the brainstem area.

In Italy, medical doctors have confirmed that the brainstem subluxation is an underlying cause of M.S. These findings were presented to a large group of Upper Cervical Doctors at a conference in Charlotte a couple of months ago. The researchers in Italy have teamed with the American UC docs that have re-located there to offer our brand of health care to the first of what will hopefully be many European countries. Anyhow, as soon as I have the written research in hand to do a report on for you - you'll have it. Again, I feel it further establishes the credibility of what I do...

Here in the States, an article was recently published in the National MS Society magazine. A patient of mine was kind enough to bring me a copy, as she'd heard about the Italian research from me and intrigued by the relevancy of this particular article in relation to it. What the article detailed was a study performed by multiple medical doctors (some from here and some from Italy) that sought to identify a new condition that they feel could be, at the very least, a contributing factor in the development of MS. The condition is called CCSVI (Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency) - "an abnormality in blood drainage from the brain and spinal cord that may contribute to nervous system damage." In real world terms, all that means is that the blood vessels are narrowed causing decreased blood flow...

After reading through the article three times, I came to the following conclusion: they're getting there, but they aren't quite grasping the simple, easy to understand neurology and anatomy staring them in the face. Decreased blood flow is a direct result of the brainstem subluxation. Because the brainstem area is the main intersection for the fluid flow between the brain and the rest of the body, interfering with it can quite easily decrease the blood flow between the brain and the body. To give you a practical example - do any of you sleep on your stomach? Think, for a moment, about the torque that you put on your upper neck when you turn it and lay on it. What happens when you do so is that you place a great deal of strain on the vertebral arteries that run travel through the small openings on either side of the top bone in the neck (which I've included a picture of). The restriction of blood flow to the brain is the result.

The brainstem subluxation is a condition that mimics what happens when you sleep on your stomach, interfering with fluid flow (blood, cerebrospinal fluid, etc) in the body. That being the essential premise around which the theory of CCSVI is based, it's fair to say that correcting the brainstem subluxation is a simple, non-invasive way to go about eliminating CCSVI. Medical suggestions are to do a surgical procedure to correct CCSVI, but that's completely unnecessary and one of the main reasons I say that they "they just don't quite get it, yet." A stint to improve blood flow is not the answer to such a simple problem.

So, as per usual, I encourage you to think outside the box. Look at the research that is available and keep an open mind to the so-called alternative approaches to health. The above discussion was intended to show that you, "Hey - even the well-established conventional doctors are taking notice of the importance of what I teach/preach about all the time." Slowly, but surely, changes are taking place...


Thinking good things for you, as always,

Dr. Chad